Posted tagged ‘eruption’

Beautiful Sunsets Due to Sarychev Peak Eruption

July 1, 2009

The Sarychev Peak eruption, captured by the International Space Station on June 12th, is causing “volcanic lavender” sunsets across Europe and the northern United States.  The Sarychev Peak Volcano blew massive plumes of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and other debris into the stratosphere creating the effect.

Here is the amazing picture of the June 12th eruption taken from the ISS:

The International Space Station captured this image of the Sarychev Peak volcano erupting.  Image credit:  NASA

The International Space Station captured this image of the Sarychev Peak volcano erupting. Image credit: NASA

Scientists are very excited to have this rare image  in order to learn more about the early stages of powerful volcanic eruptions.

Here is an image of the sunsets the eruption is causing:

June 30th sunset in Reims, France.  Image credit:  Benjamin Poupard/SpaceWeather.com

June 30th sunset in Reims, France. Image credit: Benjamin Poupard/SpaceWeather.com

Saturday Eruption at Mt. Redoubt

April 6, 2009
Mt. Redoubt during overflight on April 5, 2009. Photo Credit:  Heather Bleick, AVO/USGS

Mt. Redoubt during overflight on April 5, 2009. Photo Credit: Heather Bleick, AVO/USGS

Another significant eruption on Saturday signals that Mt. Redoubt is showing no signs of stopping.  An ash cloud was sent 50,000 feet into the air.  Typically, when Mt. Redoubt enters an eruption phase, it erupts for months.  So, Alaskans are likely to experience many more eruptions by Mt. Redoubt.

Science in the News this Weekend

March 30, 2009
Mt. Redoubt ash plume.  Phot Credit:  Tricia Joy Sadler/AVO

Mt. Redoubt ash plume. Photo Credit: Tricia Joy Sadler/AVO

First, Mt. Redoubt continued to erupt several times on Saturday, March 28, sending volcanic ash to Anchorage, 100 miles to the northeast.  The ash plume was 45,000 to 50,000 feet high on Saturday.  After the first eruption, there was also strong seismic activity.  The Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport shut down due to the ash, but reopened on Sunday and is expected to be fully operational on Tuesday.  On Sunday, Mt. Redoubt did not erupt, but it did have low-level tremors.   For more information, see the Associated Press article here.

Discovery Landing on Saturday.  Photo Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Discovery Landing on Saturday. Photo Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Second, the Space Shuttle Discovery landed in Florida on Saturday, ending its 13 day mission to the International Space Station (ISS).   Discovery brought Dr. Sandra Magnus back to Earth after four months in space at the International Space Station.  She was replaced aboard the ISS by Koichi Wakata, a Japanese astronaut, who arrived via Discovery. Additionally, a Russian Soyuz capsule with an American tourist on board has docked safely at the International Space Station just a few days after Discovery’s departure.  For more information, see here.

Mt. Redoubt Erupts Again Today

March 26, 2009
Mt. Reboubt ash plume, March 26.  Photo Credit:  Steve Baird/AVO

Mt. Redoubt ash plume, March 26. Photo Credit: Steve Baird/AVO

Mt. Redoubt erupted twice this morning again.  The second eruption was described as a major event and sent ash 12 miles into the air, the highest ash plume so far since Mt. Redoubt came to life on Sunday night.  For more information, see here.

Eruptions at Mt. Redoubt Again

March 25, 2009
Mt. Redoubt in Mid-March.  Photo credit:  Alaska Volcano Observatory

Mt. Redoubt in Mid-March. Photo credit: Alaska Volcano Observatory

Mt. Redoubt erupted twice on today, once around 5:00 am and then again around 10:15 am.  These blasts were much smaller and more brief than the eruptions on Sunday and Monday.  The Alaska Volcano Observatory has lots of interesting information on Mt. Redoubt and other Alaska volcanoes available here.

Mt. Redoubt Erupts

March 23, 2009
Mt. Redoubt, Alaska

Mt. Redoubt, Alaska. Photograph by Cyrus Read/AVO/USGS

Mt. Redoubt in Alaska became active on Sunday evening with a series of eruptions beginning late in the evening.  The eruption has spawned earthquakes and mudflows.  It may create a new lava dome also.    According to Tina Neal, a volcanologist at the Alaska Volcano Observatory in Anchorage, the eruption may continue for an indefinite period of time.  For more information on the Mt. Redoubt eruption, see here.