Posted tagged ‘Hubble Space Telescope’

Detailed Images of Pluto

February 5, 2010

Three views of Pluto. Image credit: NASA, ESA, and M. Buie (Southwest Research Institute)

NASA released what are the sharpest pictures yet of Pluto taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2002-2003.  384 of these photos were combined in a project that took four years and 20 computers.  The result offers what is thought to be a true-color view of Pluto.  While these photos offer a new look at Pluto, the probe New Horizons is half-way to the dwarf planet.  When the probe arrives in 2015, it will offer new, close-up perspectives on Pluto.

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Hubble Captures Unique Image

February 4, 2010

P/2010 A2. Image credit: NASA, ESA, and D. Jewitt

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured what astronomers believe to be the remains of a recent collision between two asteroids.  Dubbed P/2010 A2, the comet-like object has a X-pattern near its nucleus, a pattern which is very different from typical comets.  These images were captured using the new Wide Field Camera 3 which was installed during the May 2009 shuttle mission to repair and refurbish the Hubble.

Hubble Finds Youngest Known Galaxies

January 6, 2010

Hubble image of the youngest known galaxies. Image credit: NASA

Using its new infrared Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), which was installed in May, the Hubble Space Telescope was able to identify what are the most distant, and thus, the youngest known galaxies so far.  These compact, ultra-blue galaxies started forming around 13.2 billion years ago.  Although the new WFC3 allows astronomers to see much further than the previous Hubble camera, it will soon be at its limit.  But, a replacement is in the wings with the James Webb Space Telescope planned for launch in 2014.

Hubble Shows Us A Beautiful Collision

October 16, 2009

NGC 2623 or Arp 243. (Image Credit:  NASA, ESA and A. Evans (Stony Brook University, New York)).

NGC 2623 or Arp 243. (Image Credit: NASA, ESA and A. Evans (Stony Brook University, New York)).

This image from the Hubble Space Telescope looks like a two-armed galaxy.  Instead, what is actually captured in this image are two spiral galaxies in a high-speed collision 250 million light-years away.  This double galaxy, NGC 2623 or Arp 243, is located in the constellation Cancer.  The collision has caused the two galaxies to merge at their cores, but clusters of young stars are forming in the arms.  For more information, see Discover.

NASA Releases Photos from Upgraded Hubble

September 9, 2009

NASA has released the latest batch of photographs taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.  All the photos were taken after the Hubble was upgraded in May.  You can check out a photo of the Butterfly Nebula or Bug Nebula below.

Planetary Nebula NGC 6302 also know as the Butterfly Nebula or Bug Nebula.  This picture was taken by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3.  Image credit:  NASA, ESA, the Hubble SM4 ERO Team, and ST-ECF

Planetary Nebula NGC 6302 also know as the Butterfly Nebula or Bug Nebula. This picture was taken by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3. Image credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble SM4 ERO Team, and ST-ECF

Hubble Captures Best Images Yet of Jupiter Collision

July 28, 2009

NASA interrupted testing the recent upgrades to the Hubble Space Telescope to examine the recent Jupiter collision.  Using the newly installed Wide Field Camera 3, Hubble was able to snap the best images so far of the collision.  Given that Hubble is not fully calibrated, these images are very exciting.  For more on these images, see NASA’s Hubble website.

View of Jupiter's collision as seen by the Hubble.  This picture was taken on July 23, 2009.  mage Credit: NASA, ESA, and H. Hammel (Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colo.), and the Jupiter Impact Team

View of Jupiter's collision as seen by the Hubble. This picture was taken on July 23, 2009. mage Credit: NASA, ESA, and H. Hammel (Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colo.), and the Jupiter Impact Team

Up and Away!

June 1, 2009
Carried aboard a NASA 747, the space shuttle Atlantis departs the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., enroute to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, beginning the last leg of STS-125, its mission to repair the Hubble space telescope, Monday, June 1, 2009. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

Carried aboard a NASA 747, the space shuttle Atlantis departs the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., enroute to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, beginning the last leg of STS-125, its mission to repair the Hubble space telescope, Monday, June 1, 2009. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)